Space Industry News

Last news from SpaceNews

Spaceflight offers lunar flyby rideshare mission

Sherpa-ES

Launch services provider Spaceflight sees a lunar flyby mission opportunity next year as a pathfinder for future opportunities to support customers going to both geostationary orbit and the moon.

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Blue Origin, Rocket Lab, SpaceX, ULA win Space Force contracts for rocket technology projects

Blue Origin, Rocket Lab, SpaceX and United Launch Alliance were selected to participate in Space Force development projects to advance rocket engine testing and launch vehicle upper stages.

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Op-ed | Can we backhaul our way to space?

If the market grows large enough, a dedicated lunar-to-LEO tanker industry could evolve – which might never happen if the infrastructure for supplying space facilities with lunar water had to be paid for up front and from scratch, before any water was delivered.

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UN secretary-general criticizes “billionaires joyriding to space”

The secretary-general of the United Nations lumped space tourism alongside corruption and loss of freedoms as part of a “malady of mistrust” facing the world, another sign of the backlash in some quarters to private human spaceflight.

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Orbit Fab to launch propellant tanker to fuel satellites in geostationary orbit

Orbit Fab, a startup offering a refueling service in space, will launch a propellant tanker to geostationary orbit on a SpaceX Falcon 9 lunar lander mission projected for late 2022 or early 2023.

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House committee presses NOAA on commercial weather data and space traffic management

Spire Lemur cubesat

Members of the House Science Committee asked the new administrator of NOAA to make more use of commercial satellite data and take action on space traffic management.

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Last news from Spacewatch.global

#SpaceWatchGL Column: Dongfang Hour China Aerospace News Roundup 20 – 26 September 2021

#SpaceWatchGL Column: Dongfang Hour China Aerospace News Roundup 20 – 26 September 2021

As part of the partnership between SpaceWatch.Global and Orbital Gateway Consulting we have been granted permission to publish selected articles and texts. We are pleased to present “Dongfang Hour China Aerospace News Roundup 20 - 26 September 2021”. A special shout-out to our friends at SpaceWatch.Global

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SPS and MarketDev enter business development partnership

SPS and MarketDev enter business development partnership

Space Structures (SPS) and MarketDev announced a business development partnership to extend SPS’s presence in North America and other international markets, SPS said. Berlin-based developer and manufacturer, SPS is planning to capitalize on the rapid growth of the space industry.

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NASA awards $600 million Orion contract to Aerojet Rocketdyne

NASA awards $600 million Orion contract to Aerojet Rocketdyne

NASA has awarded a contract the development of the Orion Main Engine (OME), which will be used on the Orion spacecraft as part of the Artemis program, to Aerojet Rocketdyne, the U.S. space agency and the company said. Aerojet Rocketdyne will deliver up to 20 OME engines for use on Artemis missions beginning with Artemis VII.

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Myriota scales up IoT on Spire Global´s fleet

Myriota scales up IoT on Spire Global´s fleet

The data, analytics, and space services provider Spire Global partners with Myriota to develop space-based Internet of Things (IoT) connectivity. Myriota will use Spire's existing satellite platform and continue to scale the Myriota Network as Spire deploys new satellites, Spire said.

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UN secretary-general Guterres criticizes space tourism

UN secretary-general Guterres criticizes space tourism

António Guterres, the secretary-general of the United Nations, mentioned space tourism alongside corruption and loss of freedoms as cause for the ever-increasing gap between socioeconomic groups. Addressing the General Assembly, Guterres said “billionaires joyriding to space” led to the growing mistrust towards governments and the values of the UN.

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Space Café Recap: “Law Breakfast with Steven Freeland” #5

Space Café Recap: “Law Breakfast with Steven Freeland” #5

In the latest Space Café “Law Breakfast with Steven Freeland”, Steven Freeland and Torsten Kriening welcomed Setsuko Aoki and Peter Hulsrøj at a wonderful café in downtown Tokyo. Over bagels, croissants, coffee, and other treats, we discussed many legal issues arising from everyday space activities, including the following:

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Last news from ESA

Microgravity on demand with Earth return through ESA’s Boost!

Space Forge supported by ESA's Boost! programme will offer a commercial space transportation service from 2022

A new round-trip commercial space transportation service from 2022, backed by ESA, will enable companies to manufacture in space very pure and more capable materials, discover new pharmaceutical drugs and bring them back for use on Earth.

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Going hyperspectral for CHIME

Hyperspectral image cube showing Mount Vesuvius, Italy

With Covid restrictions a little more relaxed, scientists from Europe and the USA were finally able to team up for a long-awaited field experiment to ensure that a new Copernicus satellite called CHIME will deliver the best possible data products as soon as it is operational in orbit. This new mission is being developed to support EU policies on the management of natural resources, ultimately helping to address the global issue of food security.

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For reasons by Vivaldi

Image:

A female volunteer gets comfortable in her waterbed, as the dry immersion study to recreate some of the effects of spaceflight on the body kicks off this week in Toulouse, France. Called Vivaldi, or Validation of the Dry Immersion, the campaign features all female-participants in a European first.

Immersion begins when water covers the subject above the thorax, immobilised with legs and trunk covered with a cotton sheet. Only the arms and head remain free outside the tarp.

As a result, the body experiences ‘supportlessness’ – something close to what astronauts feel while floating on the International Space Station.

In weightlessness, astronauts’ bodies lose muscle and bone density, vision changes and fluids shift to the brain. Finding ways to stay healthy in orbit is a large part of human spaceflight research.

Volunteers spend almost 24 hours a day in the immersion tank, limiting their movements as much as possible. Each day starts at 7 am with urine and blood samples, followed by scientific protocols and measurements to study how the body adapts.

All activities from leisure to hygiene are done within the constraints of immersion. Only a small pillow is allowed during meals to ease eating. Showering and transfer to other experiments are done outside of the tank while lying on their backs and with their head tilted 6 degrees down to minimise fluid shifts.  

The results from this type of research do not only benefit astronauts but have implications for patients on Earth with similar disorders and elderly people.  

This is the only the second time a dry immersion campaign takes place with all-female participants, and it is a first for Europe. ESA decided to launch the study to address the gender gap in science data.

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Week in images: 20 - 24 September 2021

The Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission shows us a cloudy view of the Cumbre Vieja volcano on the Spanish Canary Island of La Palma.

Week in images: 20 - 24 September 2021

Discover our week through the lens

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Layered history

Layered history Image: Layered history

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Earth from Space: Calabria, Italy

Calabria, often referred to as the ‘boot’ of Italy, is featured in this image captured by the Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission.

Calabria, often referred to as the ‘boot’ of Italy, is featured in this image captured by the Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission.

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